False radiometric dating assumptions

Are you seeking knowledge and tools to help refute such foolishness?Would you like to be the bane of forums and comments sections about pseudoscience, grand conspiracies, quackery, or the supernatural?Bishop James Ussher, a 17th-century Irish cleric, for example, calculated that creation occurred in 4004 B. There were many other such estimates, but they invariably resulted in an Earth only a few thousand years old.By the late 18th century, some naturalists had begun to look closely at the ancient rocks of the Earth.The trouble with the world is not that people know too little, but that they know so many things that ain't so.--Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens), Will Rogers (William Penn Adair), or Josh Billings (Henry Wheeler Shaw) When you read or overhear nonsense or the besmirching of science, do you have an urge to respond and set things straight?Radiocarbon dating can easily establish that humans have been on the earth for over twenty thousand years, at least twice as long as creationists are willing to allow.Therefore it should come as no surprise that creationists at the Institute for Creation Research (ICR) have been trying desperately to discredit this method for years.

And in the case of grand conspiracy believers, any argument against the conspiracy becomes an argument for the conspiracy, as contrary evidence was planted and absent evidence was removed. But you might be able to sow a seed of reality that could rear its rational sprout years later. Apart from having fun, the primary goal should be the defense of quality science because it's such an amazingly useful tool for discovery and progress.

Lord Kelvin and Clarence King calculated the length of time required for the Earth to cool from a white-hot liquid state; they eventually settled on 24 million years.

James Joly calculated that the Earth’s age was 89 million years on the basis of the time required for salt to accumulate in the oceans.

James Hutton, a physician-farmer and one of the founders of the science of geology, wrote in 1788, “The result, therefore, of our present inquiry is, that we find no vestige of a beginning, — no prospect of an end.” Although this may now sound like an overstatement, it nicely expresses the tremendous intellectual leap required when geologic time was finally and forever severed from the artificial limits imposed by the length of the human lifetime.

By the mid- to late 1800s, geologists, physicists, and chemists were searching for ways to quantify the age of the Earth.

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